For those of you not aware, I did a podcast series with the Development Research Institute at NYU earlier this year. It was nine episodes focusing on development that happens on a level other than the nation-state. Each episode featured me discussing a paper with its author and is worth checking out. My favorite one is probably the fourth episode, focusing on the centuries-long history of one New York City block. Here’s the summary:

Between Houston and Prince Streets on Greene Street in lower Manhattan, one city block has undergone dramatic changes over the course of four centuries. Today this Greene Street block is home to luxury retail and expensive residences, but not too long ago it was filled with art galleries, brothels, and garment manufacturing. The shifts in the block’s physical character and value were often sudden and totally unanticipated. Looking only at the nation-state level can obscure meaningful growth that occurs on much smaller levels, but how much can we learn from looking at just a city block? William Easterly of New York University tells us about this exciting and surprising history of one New York City block and what it can teach us about development.

Here’s a link to the iTunes page.